Tag Archives: fhcn

Breast Cancer Basics

October 11th, 2021
It’s October, and we all know that October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Look around. See all the pink ribbons? The color pink is a reminder to learn the basics of breast cancer and then get screened. And men, don’t think this doesn’t apply to you. Though it’s much more common in women, breast cancer affects men, too. Consider these facts. About one in eight American women will develop breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. Breast cancer…

Here’s to Having Healthy Lungs

October 5th, 2021
Lung disease kills 4 million people every year. It kills more people than any other disease worldwide. Lung disease is a broad term that encompasses multiple conditions that prevent your lungs from working properly. October is Healthy Lung Month. Let’s use this time to learn more about our lungs and some of the disorders that threaten their health. Your lungs are a pair of air-filled organs located in your chest. Each lung is made up of smaller sections called lobes.…

It’s National ITP Awareness Month. What’s ITP?

September 19th, 2021
ITP is immune thrombocytopenia, a fairly common blood disorder. People with ITP have a lower than normal number of platelets in their blood. Platelets are blood cell fragments that clump together at the site of an injury to form a clot and help stop bleeding.. “Thrombocytes” is another word for platelets, and “penia” means “lack” or “deficiency.” So the term thrombocytopenia literally means “a deficiency of platelets.” ITP is “immune” because your immune system is stimulated to attack your own…

A Study of Sickle Cell Disease

September 10th, 2021
Sickle cell disease is a group of inherited disorders affecting the red blood cells. Healthy red blood cells are disc-shaped and smooth, and glide easily through even small blood vessels to provide oxygen to the body’s tissues. Red blood cells affected by sickle cell disease are rigid, sticky and crescent-shaped, resembling the farm implement called a sickle. The exact number of people living with sickle cell disease in the US is unknown, but it’s estimated that approximately 100,000 Americans, mainly…

Considering Your Cholesterol

September 2nd, 2021
Consider this. Most people can tell you the number attached to their cholesterol level, but do they really understand what it means? What’s behind all those terms, and what is cholesterol anyway? What’s your cholesterol IQ? To help raise it a few points, here’s a quick refresher course in honor of National Cholesterol Education Month. Cholesterol is really not that complicated. It’s basically a waxy, fat-like substance made naturally by the body, in the liver. The liver alone makes enough…

Catching Up On Children’s Eye Health

August 10th, 2021
Newborns can see colors and objects up to 12 inches away, and their vision gets progressively sharper as they get older. By the time they reach school age, children should possess clear, comfortable vision at all distances. But problems can develop as your child’s vision matures. Most childhood vision problems emerge between 18 months and 4 years old. The most common vision problems affecting children are refractive errors, amblyopia and strabismus. Refractive errors occur when the eye can’t focus light…

A Different Kind of Drug Problem

October 15th, 2017
The world has a drug problem! It’s getting so bad that the United Nations held a special meeting last September to discuss it - only the fourth time ever the UN called a high-level meeting on a global health issue. This time, the delegates discussed antibiotic-resistant infections, the superbugs impervious to our current arsenal of germ-fighting drugs. Drug-resistant bacteria, as well as drug-resistant parasites, viruses and fungi, have been lurking for a while. One superbug has been popping up, even…

A Different Kind of Drug Problem

July 31st, 2017
The world has a drug problem! It’s getting so bad that the United Nations held a special meeting last September to discuss it. It was only the fourth time ever the UN called a high-level meeting on a global health issue. This time, the delegates discussed antibiotic-resistant infections – superbugs impervious to our current arsenal of germ-fighting drugs. Drug-resistant bacteria, as well as drug-resistant parasites, viruses and fungi, have been lurking for a while. One superbug has been popping up,…

Brain Injuries, Briefly

March 8th, 2017
March is Brain Injury Awareness Month, and organizations like the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) want people to know more about these dangerous injuries and their aftermath. Here’s a little information to help. Brain injuries involve acquired damage to the brain. The damage is not the result of heredity, congenital defects or degeneration. There are many possible causes of brain injury, including certain infectious diseases, oxygen starvation, seizures, stroke, exposure to toxins, trauma and tumors. According to BIAA, more…

Counting Your Steps

December 14th, 2016
Is a fitness tracker on your wish list this year? The wearable technology gadgets seem to be on wrists everywhere, so you’ll have lots of company. In 2019, about one-in-five people in the United States use a smart watch or a fitness tracker. Fitness trackers count steps and calorie burn. They can show how many hours you actually slept. Some measure heart rate and estimate oxygen uptake. All from wearing what looks like a rubber bracelet. Keeping up with all…