Category Archives: Health

Keeping Up With Kidney Health

March 29th, 2021
If you’re like most people, you have two kidneys, the bean-shaped organs about the size of your fist that lie just below the rib cage, one on each side of your spine. March is National Kidney Month, so let’s review what the kidneys do, examine a few common diseases that can affect them, and learn some ways you can help keep them healthy. Adult and child holding kidney shaped paper, world kidney day, National Organ Donor Day, charity donation concept…

What Does Diet Really Mean?

March 2nd, 2021
What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the word “diet”? Did you immediately think of a restrictive eating regimen that deprives you of your favorite foods? I think most people look at “diet” that way, and because they see it as depriving, they consider diet a bad thing. For most people, a diet is a tool for losing weight. And according to a survey spearheaded by the International Food and Information Council, 77 percent of Americans…

Common ENT Disorders

February 15th, 2021
According to the American Academy of Otolayrngology’s Division of Head and Neck Surgery, ear, nose, and throat disorders are one of the main reasons children see a physician, and ear infections rank as the number one reason. February is Kids ENT Health Month, so this blog reviews a few of the more common ENT disorders that affect children. Just about every child will experience an ear infection at some point. My child was no exception; he had his share. Acute…

Children’s Dental Health: Starting Off Strong

February 10th, 2021
Children have 20 baby, or primary, teeth – 10 on the top and 10 on the bottom. The primary teeth begin to come in at around 6 months of age, and by the time your child is 2 to 3 years old, all of the primary teeth should have come in. On the flip side, most adults have 32 permanent teeth, including four wisdom teeth, which are often removed for lack of space in the mouth. Primary teeth are technically…

Raise Your Glaucoma IQ

January 11th, 2021
Glaucoma is a group of progressive diseases that can damage your eye’s optic nerve and cause vision loss, even blindness. There are many theories, but the exact cause of glaucoma is unknown. It is most often related to a build-up of pressure inside your eye. When this pressure, called intraocular pressure, or IOP, remains high over time, it begins to harm optic nerve fibers. IOP increases when the fluid inside your eye, called aqueous humor, which normally flows out of…

Handwashing for a Healthy Life and Community

December 14th, 2020
When it comes to staying healthy, it helps to remember your mom’s advice to, “Wash your hands.” And the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention backs up your mom. They maintain that, “Keeping hands clean is one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others.” Let’s explore why the CDC’s statement is true. First, consider these germ facts, courtesy of Tri-County Health Care in Minnesota: • There are between 2…

Bolstering Bladder Health

November 9th, 2020
November is Bladder Health Awareness Month. Your bladder is a hollow, muscular sac located in your lower abdomen. It temporarily stores the urine made by your kidneys until it is released into a tube called the urethra, which transports the urine out of your body. When empty, the bladder is about the size and shape of a pear. The muscles of the bladder enable it to stretch to hold urine. A healthy bladder can hold one and a half to…

Brushing Up on Dental Hygiene

October 26th, 2020
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that 69 percent of Americans ages 35 to 44 have lost at least one of their permanent teeth. The CDC also notes that by age 50, Americans have typically lost an average of 12 teeth, including their wisdom teeth. Further, among adults ages 65 to 74, 26 percent have lost all their teeth. You don’t have to be one of those statistics. You can keep your teeth – and your…

Highlighting Health Literacy

October 5th, 2020
One of the biggest problems that health care providers have to deal with pertains to health literacy, which is a person’s ability to understand health care information and navigate the health care system. Currently, health literacy in the United States is woefully deficient. So what exactly is health literacy? There are many definitions out there, but the concept behind them is essentially the same. An example comes from the American Medical Association Foundation, which defines health literacy as: “the ability…

AFib: Hurried Heartbeats

September 21st, 2020
Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is the most common type of irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia. With AFib, your heart beats much faster than the normal 60 to 100 beats per minute. To create a normal heart rhythm, or sinus rhythm, your heart’s upper and lower chambers must work in concert. But with AFib, the activity of those chambers is out of sync. The heart pumps blood to the rest of the body, and the pumping is controlled by the heart’s own…