The Waiting Room

Donate Life

April 17th, 2017
April is National Donate Life Month. It’s a chance to put the spotlight on the issue of organ, eye and tissue donation in this country. First, let’s take a look at some statistics. According to Donate Life America, more than 118,000 men, women and children are awaiting lifesaving organ transplants. Every ten minutes, another person is added to the national transplant waiting list. Every year in the US, 8,000 deaths occur because organs are not donated in time. The heart,…

Weight and Cancer Risk

April 10th, 2017
There are a slew of health consequences that go along with carrying excess weight. It increases the risk of many problems, including heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, kidney disease and joint disorders. What’s more, research has linked weight and obesity to many types of cancers. As part of one study, researchers analyzed 204 previously published studies to explore a possible link between weight gain, obesity, waist size and 38 different cancers. The results, which were released in March 2017, found…

Seeing the Light about Sleep

April 3rd, 2017
The promise of better sleep makes me want to go camping. Sleeping outdoors for just a few nights – without a smartphone – is enough to reset body clocks in a way that makes it easier to get more sleep, according to studies. The crux is how light affects circadian rhythms, the body’s built-in system for signaling sleep time and when to wake. Camping provides exposure to plenty of natural light and dark, which researchers suggested prompted a shift in…

Dog Daze

March 27th, 2017
It’s not uncommon anymore to be out shopping and see a customer in the aisle accompanied by a dog. For a long time, we expected people led by dogs in public to be blind, but today, dogs provide many more services than just being the “seeing eyes.” Nowadays, dogs hear for those with hearing loss, detect the onset of seizures…

Stalking the Superbugs

March 20th, 2017
It’s funny how things happen sometimes. When Alexander Fleming woke up the morning of September 28, 1928, he had no idea he would discover the first commercially available antibiotic – penicillin. After the antibiotic was isolated and purified, it came into wide use during World War II. When accepting the Nobel Prize for his discovery in 1945, Fleming warned of bacteria becoming resistant to penicillin. More than 70 years later, his warning message has become a reality – in spades.…

Brain Injuries, Briefly

March 8th, 2017
March is Brain Injury Awareness Month, and organizations like the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) want people to know more about these dangerous injuries and their aftermath. Here’s a little information to help. Brain injuries involve acquired damage to the brain. The damage is not the result of heredity, congenital defects or degeneration. There are many possible causes of brain injury, including certain infectious diseases, oxygen starvation, seizures, stroke, exposure to toxins, trauma and tumors. According to BIAA, more…

Counting Your Steps

December 14th, 2016
Is a fitness tracker on your wish list this year? The wearable technology gadgets seem to be on wrists everywhere, so you’ll have lots of company. By the end of 2015, people in the United States owned nearly 33 million of the devices. Fitness trackers count steps and calorie burn. They can show how many hours you actually slept. Some measure heart rate and estimate oxygen uptake. All from wearing what looks like a rubber bracelet. Keeping up with all…

“Mysterious Illness” on the Rise

December 7th, 2016
There’s a mysterious, polio-like illness cropping up across the US. It’s called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM. It’s quite rare, affecting only one in one million people, but from January 1 to September 30, 2016, 89 people in 33 states were diagnosed with AFM, 37 in September alone. And in October, the death of a 6-year old boy is suspected to be the very first linked to the illness. Those stats are alarming the US Centers for Disease Control and…

Baby Boomers and Hepatitis C

November 30th, 2016
Here’s a heads up, Baby Boomers! The US Preventive Service Task Force and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend we all get tested for hepatitis C. That’s because adults born between 1945 and 1965 are five times more likely to have been exposed to the hepatitis C virus than the rest of the population. One out of every 30 Boomers has been exposed. These statements scream two big questions: What’s the deal with hepatitis C and why are…

The Healthcare Election

October 19th, 2016
With news of more exchanges closing, fewer healthy enrollees signing up, insurance companies pulling out, and health insurance premiums set to spike, this October we will see a tighter turn in the death spiral of ObamaCare. There is no doubt about the higher premiums and lack of choices in ObamaCare. What should be done in its aftermath is up for debate. This makes the November presidential election a significant turning point in our national healthcare conversation. When it comes to…

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